Homophones and Typos Hurt Your Writing

My name is Mark and I am your Hyper-Speller.

What is Hyper-Spelling? It is my unique talent to find spelling errors in published books. I am your spelling proofreader.

Do I find spelling errors in a lot of books? Yes, I do, I find spelling errors in over 95% of published books, mainstream publishers included.

How many books do I read in a year? On average I read a book a week, that’s 50 to 55 books each year. I review most of these books also, my book reviews are located at https://www.wordrefiner.com

Do I ever find a book without spelling errors? Yes, one book a year on average is spelling error free.

I love to read and I hate spelling errors because they interrupt the pure pleasure of reading. I hope you will enjoy my posts as I talk about words that can trip most any writer at one time or another.

What is Word Refining?

Most any dictionary: Refine– to remove impurities and imperfections, to make purer.

horse shoe molding

Like a blacksmith with heat, hammer and anvil; I work the written word, purifying all spelling errors, to bring clarity to your message and voice. I have been doing this kind of work for all types of literature, fiction and non-fiction, casual and technical. For over 40 years I have refined many types of spelling errors which fall into 4 main categories:

  1. Misspelled words- words that are commonly caught by the spellcheckers on our computers. Some computers apparently do not have a spellchecker or the writer chooses not to use it. I see this type of error more frequently than expected.

  2. Misplaced words- words that are correctly spelled but used in the wrong context. Most spellcheckers are not very good at context. These types of errors are commonly caused by homophones and typographical errors.

  3. Missing words- words that are not there but should be.

  4. Multiple words- a word used too too many times in a sentence; like this sentence.

Of these errors, #2 is what I see the most. There are many reasons that these errors are so prevalent; not the least of is, that the English language is such a hodgepodge of bits and pieces of other languages, it is full of words that sound alike and have different spellings. These words are known as homophones and there are thousands in the English language.

Homophones that nearly everybody might be familiar with includes: to, too, two, or do, due, and dew. There are a lot of them in our everyday life, one of my favorites is right, write, rite, and wright. Quadruple homophones, are rare as a four-leaf clover. I will be doing a series on these homophone groups.

Typographical errors are caused by less than accurate typing. It is quite easy to write a correctly spelled word by typing only one letter wrong. Must, mist and most is a good example, the second letter of each word is different and all three of the vowels are side by side on our qwerty keyboard. Thank you Mr. Qwerty for that big favor. 😉 There are other ways to make a valid word with typographical errors. I will write about many of these types of errors also.

Because so many of us have become accustomed to thinking like we speak, we write what we hear in our head without always taking the time to verify the proper spelling. If the spell checker sees a correctly spelled word on its list, then an invisible spelling error is created. It will sit there, silently smirking, until it is exposed and corrected. My mission is to reveal these errors and set writing straight.

The downside here is that we are constantly represented by our written words, if words are not correctly spelled, then we have not put our best foot forward. We may find the first impression we give is the only opportunity we get. Poor spelling can cause us not just problems but can cause us unanticipated hardships. In this competitive world we live in, it is essential to our success to always be at the top of our game in every way possible.

So, write right like a wright for a rite. I will be talking about these quadruple homophones and others in the future.

Words Have Meaning and Spelling Makes a Difference.

Search for my hashtags online: #HomophonesHurtYourWriting and #TyposHurtYourWriting

How can I serve you?

You can always find me at https://www.wordrefiner.com and I am Twitter a lot https://twitter.com/wordrefiner 

71 Writing Contests in June 2023 – No entry fees – by Erica Verrillo…

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

on Publishing … and Other Forms of Insanity:

This June there are more than five dozen free writing contests for short fiction, novels, poetry, CNF, nonfiction, and plays.
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Prizes range from $100,000 to publication.
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None charge entry fees.
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Some of these contests have age and geographical restrictions, so read the instructions carefully.

Get Full Details HERE

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Affect vs Effect: How to Choose the Right Word for Your Writing – by The Write Life Team…

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

Ever sat down to write a piece of text and found yourself stuck on whether to use effect or affect? You’re not the only one!

In fact, learning the difference between affect vs effect is one of the most common questions people have, which is understandable seeing as they can both be verbs and nouns, and their meanings can overlap—triple threat!

Continue reading HERE

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Rights vs. Copyright: Untangling the Confusion – by Victoria Strauss…

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

on Writer Beware:

Copyright, literally, is “the right to copy.” It guarantees the authors of creative works–including books,  artworks, films, recordings, and photographs–the exclusive right to allow others to copy and distribute the work, by whatever means and in whatever media currently exist. It also prohibits copying and distributing without the author’s permission, and includes moral rights: the right of attribution (the right to be named as the creator of the work) and the right of integrity (the right to control changes to the work).

In countries that are signatory to the Berne Convention,, the international source for copyright law (including the USA, Canada, the UK, Europe, and  many other countries), you own copyright, automatically, as soon your work is fixed in tangible form–i.e., the minute you write the words. Your ownership extends beyond your death–between 50 and 70 years, depending on which country you’re in.

Contained within 

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The Writer’s Guide to Track Changes – by Lisa Poisso…

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

If you’ve never used Microsoft Word’s Track Changes feature before, the idea of getting your manuscript back from an editor filled with all sorts of lines and squiggles you have to do something to in order to keep your novel from plummeting precipitously through a fiery ring of digital destruction and disappearing into the black maw of—

Whoa, there. Seriously, Track Changes isn’t that terrifying. Let’s take this one step at a time.

BUT FIRST—WHAT NOT TO DO: Don’t try to revise your manuscript by opening the file with tracked changes and beginning to click through it one edit or comment at a time. A typical full-length edited manuscript contains between 10,000 and 30,000 revisions—that’s right, tens of thousands. Clicking through each one is a sure path to wasted time, hard liquor, and seething regret.

Don’t try to manually transfer or key in the changes from the edited manuscript…

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Sometimes We’re the Scared Teen, Other Times, the Bold Hero. How our Writing Perspective Changes with Each Character – Guest Post by Traci Kenworth…

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

For me, writing a teenage character was my first attempt at writing. I could relate to teens as I was fast approaching that age. The teens in my world didn’t deal with a world like we see now. Oh, no. It was sort of a mixture of one of those apocalyptic/survival stories. There were dinosaurs as well as things the government had let off (hey, it was the eighties, after all, and the Cold War was fresh on our minds), and of course, instead of adults being in charge of things: the teens were the leads.

Crazy world, huh? Well, it was filled with all my favorite things at the time. And I admit, heavily influenced by the shows I watched on TV. I didn’t realize it at the time but on that training ground as I think of it now: I was learning to blend things together. Genres crossed…

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