Homophones and Typos Hurt Your Writing

My name is Mark and I am your Hyper-Speller.

What is Hyper-Spelling? It is my unique talent to find spelling errors in published books. I am your spelling proofreader.

Do I find spelling errors in a lot of books? Yes, I do, I find spelling errors in over 95% of published books, mainstream publishers included.

How many books do I read in a year? On average I read a book a week, that’s 50 to 55 books each year. I review most of these books also, my book reviews are located at https://www.wordrefiner.com

Do I ever find a book without spelling errors? Yes, one book a year on average is spelling error free.

I love to read and I hate spelling errors because they interrupt the pure pleasure of reading. I hope you will enjoy my posts as I talk about words that can trip most any writer at one time or another.

What is Word Refining?

Most any dictionary: Refine– to remove impurities and imperfections, to make purer.

horse shoe molding

Like a blacksmith with heat, hammer and anvil; I work the written word, purifying all spelling errors, to bring clarity to your message and voice. I have been doing this kind of work for all types of literature, fiction and non-fiction, casual and technical. For over 40 years I have refined many types of spelling errors which fall into 4 main categories:

  1. Misspelled words- words that are commonly caught by the spellcheckers on our computers. Some computers apparently do not have a spellchecker or the writer chooses not to use it. I see this type of error more frequently than expected.

  2. Misplaced words- words that are correctly spelled but used in the wrong context. Most spellcheckers are not very good at context. These types of errors are commonly caused by homophones and typographical errors.

  3. Missing words- words that are not there but should be.

  4. Multiple words- a word used too too many times in a sentence; like this sentence.

Of these errors, #2 is what I see the most. There are many reasons that these errors are so prevalent; not the least of is, that the English language is such a hodgepodge of bits and pieces of other languages, it is full of words that sound alike and have different spellings. These words are known as homophones and there are thousands in the English language.

Homophones that nearly everybody might be familiar with includes: to, too, two, or do, due, and dew. There are a lot of them in our everyday life, one of my favorites is right, write, rite, and wright. Quadruple homophones, are rare as a four-leaf clover. I will be doing a series on these homophone groups.

Typographical errors are caused by less than accurate typing. It is quite easy to write a correctly spelled word by typing only one letter wrong. Must, mist and most is a good example, the second letter of each word is different and all three of the vowels are side by side on our qwerty keyboard. Thank you Mr. Qwerty for that big favor. 😉 There are other ways to make a valid word with typographical errors. I will write about many of these types of errors also.

Because so many of us have become accustomed to thinking like we speak, we write what we hear in our head without always taking the time to verify the proper spelling. If the spell checker sees a correctly spelled word on its list, then an invisible spelling error is created. It will sit there, silently smirking, until it is exposed and corrected. My mission is to reveal these errors and set writing straight.

The downside here is that we are constantly represented by our written words, if words are not correctly spelled, then we have not put our best foot forward. We may find the first impression we give is the only opportunity we get. Poor spelling can cause us not just problems but can cause us unanticipated hardships. In this competitive world we live in, it is essential to our success to always be at the top of our game in every way possible.

So, write right like a wright for a rite. I will be talking about these quadruple homophones and others in the future.

Words Have Meaning and Spelling Makes a Difference.

Search for my hashtags online: #HomophonesHurtYourWriting and #TyposHurtYourWriting

How can I serve you?

You can always find me at https://www.wordrefiner.com and I am Twitter a lot https://twitter.com/wordrefiner 

Co-Authorship Part II: Shared Vision

Story Empire

Hello SE readers, Gwen with you today, and it’s my pleasure to offer Part II of the four-part series on co-authorship. Last week, John Howell mentioned that he and I wrote a book together. Using examples from our experience, he introduced co-authorship and explained some of the essential components. Today I’m going to build on his post and focus on creating a shared vision. If you missed John’s post, you can see itHERE.

Let’s start with a question. By chance, have you contributed to an anthology? If you have, you know that expectations are explained. You’re given word count limits, a theme, time-frame, and general dos and don’ts.

Authoring a book with another writer has similarities. Instead of multiple stand-alone tales, though, there’s one overarching story that might include a romance, a murder, or an adventure. These subplot threads must be seamlessly interwoven into the one story…

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How To Use Author Central And Your Amazon Author Page – by Derek Haines…

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

on Just Publishing Advice:

Amazon Author Central is an essential tool for authors who are publishing on Amazon.

From Author Central, you can improve your Amazon Author Page and your book sales page. If you are not using it, you are missing out on a huge bookselling opportunity.

When you first publish your paperback or Kindle ebook on Kindle Direct Publishing (KDP), you only get the chance to enter the essential but basic details of your book.

Your Amazon book page or sales page will include your cover and book description. But it will be unformatted and very plain.

In This Article

Amazon Author Central has so many tools to help you sell more books

Follow the author button
Use Author Central to make your Amazon book sales page stand out
Add your editorial book reviews
So much more you can do with Author Central
Add more information about…

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5 Paying Markets for Historical Fiction and Western Short Stories – by Erica Verrillo…

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

on Publishing … and Other Forms of Insanity:

Westerns were all the rage in the 1920s and 30s. Zane Grey and Louis L’Amour wrote dozens of books featuring rugged gun slinging cowboys. Movies and TV shows like Bonanza fed the public’s seemingly endless appetite for stories of the “wild west.” But starting in the late 1960s, the genre all but disappeared. Currently, Westerns have been reduced to a small corner of the “pulp fiction” genre.

While the market for historical fiction novels is robust, historical fiction short stories occupy a small niche market. For writers that is both good and bad. If you write short historical fiction, you don’t have a lot of competition, which makes getting published a little easier. But your readership won’t be as wide as more popular genres.

That being said, if you have written a shoot-em-out in the O.K. Corral or invented a new adventure…

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A Story Revision Checklist – by Linda Wilson…

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

on Writers on the Move:

Sometimes progress feels slow, but take the time to revise, and your story will sparkle

Once your first draft is written, you can begin revising. Looking at one piece of revision at a time can be helpful. After I finished the first draft of Book 2 in the Abi Wunder series, Secret in the Mist, I let the manuscript rest while working on other projects. About three weeks later, I was amazed at how much revision was needed. Every single page of my 30,000-word manuscript has #2 pencil cross-outs, squiggly lines, and deletions—every one!

To be effective, it’s good to have a revision plan. I stuck with a general revision the first time. That included condensing long-winded paragraphs, finding better word choices, making dialogue sound kid-friendly, and replacing “telling” with “showing” passages.

Again, I put the manuscript down. I wanted to begin again with fresh…

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Which Way Do I Go? Critique Groups, Critique Partners, or Beta Readers

Story Empire

Hey, SE Readers. Happy 2021. Joan here today.

No matter if you’re a beginning writer or have been writing for years, you’ve probably heard the terms critique groups, critique partners, and beta readers. Since the onset of indie publishing, critiques and beta readers are more important than ever. Traditionally published authors can benefit from these groups as well.

You may ask yourself which way to go. Let’s look a little at the differences.

Critique groups are most often composed of a group of local writers. They have a set meeting schedule with most meeting weekly or every other week. When I first began writing, I attended a weekly critique group. A published author/editor was the group leader. The feedback I received was extremely helpful as I struggled with words of my first novel.

Another plus to having a local group is friendships. Several of our members stayed in the group…

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A Creative Focus for 2021

ZARA WEST'S JOURNAL

Continuing the tradition I started several years ago, I have again chosen 12 meaningful words to focus on each month of 2021. I decided that this year I wanted every word to be an active verb. My challenge is to see how I can apply these to my writing life. Why have I done this?

Why I Focus on BIG Words

With so many things to write about, why would a writer benefit from selecting a few words to focus on in a blog? Being a writer is a time-consuming occupation. Writing alone takes up much of my day. But I also need to spend time on promotion and marketing. I have blogs like this one to write. Newsletters to get out every month. Emails to answer. Workshops to give. And an active home life too.

When preparing to write my blog posts, having a specific word to focus on…

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Behind the Scenes: My BookBub Promotion – by Judy Penz Sheluk…

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

Welcome to 2021! This year, my hope is to share more “Behind the Scenes” stories in a writer’s life. Not the part where I sit at my keyboard and create fictional worlds, but the nitty gritty business stuff that few ever talk about.

For the first post in this series, I’m going to talk about my Dec. 2, 2020 BookBub promotion for Skeletons in the Attic, book 1 in my Marketville Mystery series.

For those of you unfamiliar with BookBub, here’s a direct quote from their website:

Continue reading HERE

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