Homophones and Typos Hurt Your Writing

My name is Mark and I am your Hyper-Speller.

What is Hyper-Spelling? It is my unique talent to find spelling errors in published books. I am your spelling proofreader.

Do I find spelling errors in a lot of books? Yes, I do, I find spelling errors in over 95% of published books, mainstream publishers included.

How many books do I read in a year? On average I read a book a week, that’s 50 to 55 books each year. I review most of these books also, my book reviews are located at https://www.wordrefiner.com

Do I ever find a book without spelling errors? Yes, one book a year on average is spelling error free.

I love to read and I hate spelling errors because they interrupt the pure pleasure of reading. I hope you will enjoy my posts as I talk about words that can trip most any writer at one time or another.

What is Word Refining?

Most any dictionary: Refine– to remove impurities and imperfections, to make purer.

horse shoe molding

Like a blacksmith with heat, hammer and anvil; I work the written word, purifying all spelling errors, to bring clarity to your message and voice. I have been doing this kind of work for all types of literature, fiction and non-fiction, casual and technical. For over 40 years I have refined many types of spelling errors which fall into 4 main categories:

  1. Misspelled words- words that are commonly caught by the spellcheckers on our computers. Some computers apparently do not have a spellchecker or the writer chooses not to use it. I see this type of error more frequently than expected.

  2. Misplaced words- words that are correctly spelled but used in the wrong context. Most spellcheckers are not very good at context. These types of errors are commonly caused by homophones and typographical errors.

  3. Missing words- words that are not there but should be.

  4. Multiple words- a word used too too many times in a sentence; like this sentence.

Of these errors, #2 is what I see the most. There are many reasons that these errors are so prevalent; not the least of is, that the English language is such a hodgepodge of bits and pieces of other languages, it is full of words that sound alike and have different spellings. These words are known as homophones and there are thousands in the English language.

Homophones that nearly everybody might be familiar with includes: to, too, two, or do, due, and dew. There are a lot of them in our everyday life, one of my favorites is right, write, rite, and wright. Quadruple homophones, are rare as a four-leaf clover. I will be doing a series on these homophone groups.

Typographical errors are caused by less than accurate typing. It is quite easy to write a correctly spelled word by typing only one letter wrong. Must, mist and most is a good example, the second letter of each word is different and all three of the vowels are side by side on our qwerty keyboard. Thank you Mr. Qwerty for that big favor. 😉 There are other ways to make a valid word with typographical errors. I will write about many of these types of errors also.

Because so many of us have become accustomed to thinking like we speak, we write what we hear in our head without always taking the time to verify the proper spelling. If the spell checker sees a correctly spelled word on its list, then an invisible spelling error is created. It will sit there, silently smirking, until it is exposed and corrected. My mission is to reveal these errors and set writing straight.

The downside here is that we are constantly represented by our written words, if words are not correctly spelled, then we have not put our best foot forward. We may find the first impression we give is the only opportunity we get. Poor spelling can cause us not just problems but can cause us unanticipated hardships. In this competitive world we live in, it is essential to our success to always be at the top of our game in every way possible.

So, write right like a wright for a rite. I will be talking about these quadruple homophones and others in the future.

Words Have Meaning and Spelling Makes a Difference.

Search for my hashtags online: #HomophonesHurtYourWriting and #TyposHurtYourWriting

How can I serve you?

You can always find me at https://www.wordrefiner.com and I am Twitter a lot https://twitter.com/wordrefiner 

61 Writing Contests in December 2021 – No entry fees – by Erica Verrillo…

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

on Publishing … and Other Forms of Insanity:

This December there are more than five dozen writing contests for short fiction, novels, poetry, CNF, nonfiction, and short plays.

Prizes range from a gold medal to $25,000. None charge entry fees.

Some of these contests have age and geographical restrictions, so read the instructions carefully.

Get Full Details HERE

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The Things I’ve Heard: Confessions of an Audiobook Narrator – By William L. Hahn…

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

on Anne R. Allen:

When Love and Need Become One

So here comes a heaping helping of what’s good for my soul. I’ve always told tales. I just had trouble, the first fifty years or so, believing that people would pay me to tell them.

But I had a revelation recently, the kind that comes with advancing age and wisdom, with an insight that I deserve work that makes me happy, and above all, with getting laid off. And for the better part of the past three years, this is what I do. Up early, look for auditions, record and edit the words of other fine authors and try to bring them to the ear.

Bottom Line: I could be richer, but I don’t think I could be happier.

I believe audiobooks are the most exciting aspect of your writing that you might not be paying attention to. I’ll try…

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You Are A Writer. You Create And License Intellectual Property Assets – by Joanna Penn…

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

on The Creative Penn:

Language is powerful.

We choose words carefully in our written works because we understand their impact. They carry a message from one mind to another. They shape ideas. They can change lives.

But writers often use language carelessly when it comes to the business side of being an author, and it shows that many still don’t understand copyright, and how rights licensing can impact your publishing choices, as well as your financial future.

I’ve run across several examples of this recently in discussion with author friends and also online, so I thought it was time for a refresh on intellectual property (IP) — and how important it is to define terms as we move toward Web 3 and a new iteration of what ‘digital’ even means.

Continue reading HERE

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6 Questions to Help You Avoid Repetitive Scenes – by K.M. Weiland…

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

on Helping Writers become Authors:

It takes a lot of scenes to make a novel.

Not only do we need enough scenes to progress the plot and get the characters from Point A to Point B, we also need to reach a certain word count so the book can be a novel. (Or the movie can be a movie. Ya know.)

So how can you make sure you’re not just filling out that word count with repetitive scenes?

Continue reading HERE

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Sunday funnies

bluebird of bitterness

A Scotsman who was planning a trip to the Holy Land was aghast when he learned that it would cost sixty dollars an hour to rent a boat on the Sea of Galilee.

“In Scotland it wouldn’t have been more than twenty,” said the Scotsman.

“Yes,” said the travel agent, “but remember, the Sea of Galilee is water on which Jesus himself walked.”

The Scotsman said, “Well, at sixty dollars an hour for a boat, it’s no wonder he walked.”

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Use Your Analyzer Switch to Increase Productivity – by Jessica Conoley…

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

on Jane Friedman site:

Every writer’s brain contains an analyzer switch. The switch regulates analytical thinking, which is the part of brain that dissects drafts and figures out how to improve projects during revisions. Conversely, it regulates ideaphoria—which is the quality that helps us bang out a first draft in record time because ideas are flowing at an exponential rate.

Most of us have no idea the switch is there. We assume our brain is hardwired at its current static setting. This assumption keeps us saying things like, “I love drafting, but revisions are the worst!” While our critique partner says, “First drafts are stab-my-face-off awful to write. I can’t wait until I have enough words to start revising.” We mope over the skills we seemingly don’t possess (which others have clearly been naturally blessed with), which slows our writing process and triggers a slew of mindset issues.

If any…

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How To Outline Your Novel. Or Not – by Hank Phillippi Ryan…

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

on Career Authors:

It’s the inescapable question in writer world: plotter or a pantser? In other words, do you outline? Or not?

We all know who we think we are, but sometimes we try to change. I did. And here’s the crazy thing that happened along the way. They say you can only learn from experience, but it does not have to be your own.

Here’s what I learned from my experience in outlining.

The good news and the bad news and the good news.

Continue reading HERE

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