Homophones and Typos Hurt Your Writing

My name is Mark and I am your Hyper-Speller.

What is Hyper-Spelling? It is my unique talent to find spelling errors in published books. I am your spelling proofreader.

Do I find spelling errors in a lot of books? Yes, I do, I find spelling errors in over 95% of published books, mainstream publishers included.

How many books do I read in a year? On average I read a book a week, that’s 50 to 55 books each year. I review most of these books also, my book reviews are located at https://www.wordrefiner.com

Do I ever find a book without spelling errors? Yes, one book a year on average is spelling error free.

I love to read and I hate spelling errors because they interrupt the pure pleasure of reading. I hope you will enjoy my posts as I talk about words that can trip most any writer at one time or another.

What is Word Refining?

Most any dictionary: Refine– to remove impurities and imperfections, to make purer.

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Like a blacksmith with heat, hammer and anvil; I work the written word, purifying all spelling errors, to bring clarity to your message and voice. I have been doing this kind of work for all types of literature, fiction and non-fiction, casual and technical. For over 40 years I have refined many types of spelling errors which fall into 4 main categories:

  1. Misspelled words- words that are commonly caught by the spellcheckers on our computers. Some computers apparently do not have a spellchecker or the writer chooses not to use it. I see this type of error more frequently than expected.

  2. Misplaced words- words that are correctly spelled but used in the wrong context. Most spellcheckers are not very good at context. These types of errors are commonly caused by homophones and typographical errors.

  3. Missing words- words that are not there but should be.

  4. Multiple words- a word used too too many times in a sentence; like this sentence.

Of these errors, #2 is what I see the most. There are many reasons that these errors are so prevalent; not the least of is, that the English language is such a hodgepodge of bits and pieces of other languages, it is full of words that sound alike and have different spellings. These words are known as homophones and there are thousands in the English language.

Homophones that nearly everybody might be familiar with includes: to, too, two, or do, due, and dew. There are a lot of them in our everyday life, one of my favorites is right, write, rite, and wright. Quadruple homophones, are rare as a four-leaf clover. I will be doing a series on these homophone groups.

Typographical errors are caused by less than accurate typing. It is quite easy to write a correctly spelled word by typing only one letter wrong. Must, mist and most is a good example, the second letter of each word is different and all three of the vowels are side by side on our qwerty keyboard. Thank you Mr. Qwerty for that big favor. 😉 There are other ways to make a valid word with typographical errors. I will write about many of these types of errors also.

Because so many of us have become accustomed to thinking like we speak, we write what we hear in our head without always taking the time to verify the proper spelling. If the spell checker sees a correctly spelled word on its list, then an invisible spelling error is created. It will sit there, silently smirking, until it is exposed and corrected. My mission is to reveal these errors and set writing straight.

The downside here is that we are constantly represented by our written words, if words are not correctly spelled, then we have not put our best foot forward. We may find the first impression we give is the only opportunity we get. Poor spelling can cause us not just problems but can cause us unanticipated hardships. In this competitive world we live in, it is essential to our success to always be at the top of our game in every way possible.

So, write right like a wright for a rite. I will be talking about these quadruple homophones and others in the future.

Words Have Meaning and Spelling Makes a Difference.

Search for my hashtags online: #HomophonesHurtYourWriting and #TyposHurtYourWriting

How can I serve you?

You can always find me at https://www.wordrefiner.com and I am Twitter a lot https://twitter.com/wordrefiner 

Lady Rougepen Says: Fade to Black

Seanarchy

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In honor or Black Lives Matter, I thought Lady Rougepen should do some Ebonic (aka Black American English or African American Vernacular English) colloquialisms:

imagePut your foot in it – referring to delicious food. “Mmm-mmm. Candace really put her foot in that sweet potato pie!”

Trifling – a bum; lazy; worthless. “Rodney is so trifling that he always asks for rides, but never offers to pay for gas.”

Just a squirrel, trying to get a nut – struggling; just trying to make ends meet; fighting to survive. “Nathan didn’t realize how expensive things were until he moved out of his parents’ home. Now, he’s just a squirrel, trying to get a nut.”

Split your wig – a violent act, literally meaning to bust open your head. “Scott fell off his bike, and needed stitches. He nearly split his wig!”

See the receipts – show me the proof. “My son…

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Happy Juneteeth!

Seanarchy

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For those of you who don’t know what this holiday is about. It was June 19, 1865 that slaves in Texas finally got the message that Abraham Lincoln had freed them. Let’s celebrate 155 years of African American freedom today. Since then, my people have made remarkable contributions to science, entertainment, civil rights, and literature, and art.

God bless.

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I’m pleased to announce the release of my 8th book, Skoll’s Diary.

Africans and African Americans left Earth in 1900, and went to another planet in The Milky Way to escape mistreatment…

It’s now the year 3005 on that terraformed planet. We get a peek into the life of a bright and sensitive teenaged boy, Skoll, through his journal. He loves his world, but is curious about life on Earth. Then suddenly, an epic event casts him in the middle of a difficult decision.  The fate of the planet’s community…

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Flash Fiction: The New Guy

Seanarchy

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TheNew Guy

By Sean C. Wright Neeley   

I noticed him immediately. He arrived here too soon, but they say the higher power knows best.

He was beautiful in varying shades of purple – violet, amethyst, and lavender.

He was diminutive, but fit.

He had flawless caramel skin and large, hazel eyes. The eyes had it. They were intense with a mystery I never wanted to solve. He had a beauty mark on his left cheek – the period at the end of a sexy poem.

I knew of him before he came here, but he knew nothing of me. I decided that I would go talk to him on a day that he looked especially stunning with the clouds swirling around him in all his purple glory. His guitar hung casually from his shoulder.

“Hello.”

“Hello.” His voice was especially deep; nothing like the falsetto I had often…

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Book Recommendation: Skoll’s Diary

Seanarchy

All this recent racial tension is salt in the wound that was already opened with the pandemic. I predicted that things would get this bad in 2016. Anyway, I wrote about a social experiment for my people, last year when things were relatively, normal: how would things look for Africans and African Americans, untouched by colonization and racism on another plant in the Milky Way? Give my science fiction novel, Skoll’s Diary, a read, and let’s talk about it. It’s available in ebook and paperback form.

Afro-Sean-Commission-Final copyTitle/Genre: Skoll’s Diary/Science Fiction

Plot: Africans and African Americans left Earth in 1900, and went to another planet in The Milky Way to escape mistreatment…It’s now the year 3005 on that terraformed planet. We get a peek into the life of a bright and sensitive teenaged boy, Skoll, through his journal. He loves his world, but is curious about life on Earth. Then suddenly…

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5 Cliches in YA Dystopian Novels That Need to Stop

Pro Story Builders

My first novel was a YA Dystopian novel, and I think it’s safe to say that the genre is still close to my heart. I can’t get enough of the stories that warn us about the evils of power, corrupt governments, and societies where right and wrong are skewed beyond recognition.

And what do I do when I love something?

Make fun of it, obviously.

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I’m a huge believer in the importance of dystopian stories. It’s the writer’s job to warn us of what our lives could be like if our society travels down the wrong path.

At the same time, though, there are a ton of cliches in this genre that are overused and need to stop.

Dystopian writers and screenwriters everywhere, this one’s for you.

1. The Government is Bad

In our modern world, it seems like everyone who is a functioning member of society hates at least…

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Lady Rougepen Says: Don’t Stack!

Seanarchy

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One adjective is enough. Stacking them is redundant and unnecessary. What do I mean? Like this:

Eugene caught a big, huge fish.

“I made a dumb, stupid mistake,” Todd sighed.

Calico came to live with me when she was a tiny, little kitten.

The ice cream shop had 31 various, different flavors.

See how much stronger those sentences sound without the superfluous adjectives?

Eugene caught a huge fish.

“I made a stupid mistake,” Todd sighed.

Calico came to live with me when she was a tiny kitten.

The ice cream shop had 31 different flavors.

Just stack your pancakes from now on. Ha!

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I’m pleased to announce the release of my 8th book, Skoll’s Diary.

Africans and African Americans left Earth in 1900, and went to another planet in The Milky Way to escape mistreatment…

It’s now the year 3005 on that terraformed planet. We get a peek into…

View original post 66 more words